Educational Therapy

Educational Therapy

Students typically participate in Educational Therapy sessions 2-3 times per week for optimal growth. Educational Therapy addresses student’s academic and processing weaknesses through specialized methodologies and teaching materials. Utilizing an organized, structured and sequential approach adapted for each student, we address underlying learning skills such as anxiety, executive functioning, visual and auditory processing, attention and focus, memory skills and maladaptive responses to learning challenges. Individualized interventions are designed to remediate reading, writing and math learning problems. Educational Therapy provides educational and therapeutic approaches to help students through the learning process. Educational Therapists also provide case management and collaboration among parents, teachers and medical professionals. Additionally, they may act as an advocate on behalf of the student and participate in Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings and Section 504 plans intended to help student access educational services.

Educational Consultation
Educational consultation includes a thorough review of reports, previous evaluations, sample work and report cards, and an initial meeting with the family to discuss the child’s educational history. If needed, achievement, attention, processing, memory, social and emotional assessments are completed. Upon request, Educational Therapist also observes the child at school (in the classroom and on the playground), gathers information from the child’s teachers and other professionals in collateral meetings, and reviews relevant information from the school, pediatrician, and/or therapist. Educational Therapist integrates the findings from testing with the information gathered, and will write up a comprehensive report that explains the findings and addresses the initial concerns and questions. The results are then discussed with the family in a face-to-face feedback meeting that provides an opportunity to discuss and understand the child’s functioning in light of the new information. During this meeting the Educational Therapist will also provide a series of recommendations tailored to each child and family. Recommendations may include specific interventions that the family can do to help the child at home, services that are needed at school, and additional treatment services, such as therapy or medication consultation.

Cogmed Working Memory Training
Cogmed is an evidence-based program for helping children, adolescents, and adults sustainably improve attention by training their working memory. The complete program includes an initial interview, start-up session, five weeks of training with weekly coach calls, wrap-up meeting, six-month follow-up interview and access to the Cogmed Training Web. Studies consistently show that most people with attention deficits have a working memory deficit. That holds true for attention problems due to ADHD, traumatic brain injury, normal aging, or general deficits from working memory overload; it is also true for milder concentration problems. Research also shows that deficits in working memory are related to poor academic or professional performance. Conversely, strong working memory capacity is closely correlated with fluid intelligence. Benefits: Working memory is critical for focusing, appropriately shutting out distractions, and for complex thinking. Improved working memory capacity generalizes to improved attention, and impulse control. 8 of 10 users who complete training show measurable effects.